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aus+uk / uk.rec.gardening / latest

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 3 Days 23 Hours ago by: AnthonyL

The bloody fat squirrels tell me that our tree is a good producer. I wouldn't know, all I ever see is a green rain of husk falling.

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Plenty to practice on then! <grin> Sacrifice some of the smaller broken pieces to get the technique right.. A handy way to get a feel for the ideal pressure on the cutter is to take a scrap piece of glass, and run a number of parallel s

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

According to my Nurseryman's stock manual you sow thousands and pick out the good coloured ones chucking the rest away!

Re: Felco secateurs - which model for general pruning? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

I think what ever you find comfy I have no 7's with the rotating handle but then I am doing a lot of work with them and I get repetitive strain injury if I am not careful! wife uses the ordinary sort

Re: What pest? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

the nematodes worked a treat but 5 years later they are back!

Re: Chamaerops humilis (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

Unlikely to be seedlings as these palms are nearly always male or female so unless there is another close by suckers are much more likely. (also if seedlings you would have hundreds not just a few!)

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

Given all that useful advice I may give glass cutting another go! I have hundreds of panes from an old greenhouse but they are seldom the right size to replace storm damaged panes in my smaller green houses - Thank you

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 8 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Practice is the key - looking over the shoulder of somebody who knows what they're doing is a great help also... Some of the old Church glass has a variety of contaminants on the surface - picked up over the past 150 years or so... doe

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 13 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Only my crab apples produced any fruit, and they were very late, I don't collect them.

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 23 Hours ago by: Vir Campestris

We had so many apples that we filled our garage freezer. We're still eating stewed apple. And that's just one tree! (Cambs, FWIW) Andy

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 5 Days 11 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Useful tips, but I always understood that over time, glass, particularly glass on things like greenhouses and domestic windows, accumulated micro-scratches due to general wear and tear that caused the fracture line to deviate from what w

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 5 Days 12 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Most people who try to cut glass treat it as though they were trying to cut something like plasterboard with a Stanley knife. Light pressure on the cutter is the secret - you're not trying to cut _through_ the glass - only to score

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 1 Hour ago by: Stewart Robert Hinsl

An overview of Trilium (ovatum) development. https://tryonfriends.org/stories-of-tryon-creek/2021/3/26/trillium-the-princess-of-the-forest (It says that they not only go through a monocotyledonous stage, but also a a monophyllous stage

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 3 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Never heard that one before, someone has bashed it in the past, it has an ancient scar in the bark, but doesn't seem to be causing it any problems, I pruned all the dead twigs in reach of the ground.

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 5 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Do you beat them enough? "A woman, a dog and a walnut tree, the more you beat them the better they be!"

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 7 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

The crunch of walnut shells underfoot tells me it's produced plenty in previous years.

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 9 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

I had a fairly good year with most of the pears, all of the plums and apples producing decent crops. cherries were a washout though. I have but a single young walnut and I am not sure its ever produced anything. But it is nice to look

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 9 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

Last year was disastrous for apples (but amazingly OK for pears). There was a late frost that scorched every flower and killed off most of the pollinating insects where I live in North Yorks. A nearby more sheltered walled garden orcha

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 9 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

My trillium seedlings look somewhat like this: <https://www.flickr.com/photos/swampr0se/6931218576> They did not appear to go through a monocot stage, but perhaps I missed it.

Re: Walnut trees (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 10 Hours ago by: Chris Green

I think just about every sort of 'fruit' crop was poor last year, even our Bramleys didn't produce a lot of apples and they're usually pretty reliable. We had few raspberries and virtually no pears and only a few plums. This year *looks*

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 10 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

I don't know how it happens or why. I have only seen a handful of these oddities in many decades of seed raising that survived to flowering. Frequency is about once per decade and I raise a fair number of seeds every year. Problem is

Walnut trees

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 11 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

I have two mature walnut trees, one 10m the other 14m. Last year they produced a negligible quantity of nuts, the year before the larger one did better, I have given the larger one a good drink with a lawn sprinkler both years when it s

Re: Chamaerops humilis (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 12 Hours ago by: Primrose

<snipped but read> Thank you very much for your reply. I'm not sure if there are suckers or seed pods which have germinated over time. It doesn't seem to be a *dwarf* palm though. We'll try your suggestion on the smaller *baby* and s

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 12 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

You're welcome. I saw some other suppliers too, but they were all OOS. I must say that it didn't seem too expensive for TWAE! If you're willing to forego one piece of polycarbonate anything stiff enough to transfer the movement across

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 22 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Thanks Jeff. All the ones I saw had a top and bottom bar, so a fixed width, but that one is infinitely variable depending on the width of the glazing bars. A couple of years ago I replaced most of the glass panes with twin-wall polycarb

Re: What pest? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 1 Hour ago by: Martin Brown

Gooseberry sawfly. By the time you see this message I predict there will no leaves at all on your gooseberry bush. It doesn't harm the bush but it wrecks the crop for any year where they defoliate them entirely. My problem is with the

Re: What pest? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 7 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

As Jeff says, gooseberry sawfly. https://tinyurl.com/4cr3pzka If you've only got one or two bushes, and have the time, picking the caterpillars off by hand and squidging them is the environmentally friendly way of dealing with them. Ther

Re: Chamaerops humilis (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 8 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

The RHS web-site says it can be propagated by suckers, which I assume is what yours are. https://tinyurl.com/y63wl24q and scroll down a bit. When trying to move anything that is a sucker, the first thing I do is sever it from the parent

Re: What pest? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 8 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

Sawfly larvae? If so, it's somewhat surprising that the currants have been left alone. I'm not sure what could be used to control them. Perhaps a pyrethrin spray? Maybe let some robins into the cage? :-)

What pest?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 9 Hours ago by: Mike Rogers

What could be eating the leaves of my gooseberry bush? The currants and raspberries in the same cage haven’t been touched yet gooseberry has hardly any leaves left! Suggestions to saving the few leaves that are left?

Chamaerops humilis

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 10 Hours ago by: Primrose

Can anyone offer me any advice please. My Chamaerops humilis has grown wild since I planted it out from it's pot 14 years ago. There are four or five *babies* also growing in the soil. As the palm is taking up the garden we have had to

Re: Greenhouse louvre kit (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 10 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

No, but you might like to take a look at this: <https://www.twowests.co.uk/products/louvre-kit> If you've got a shop nearby which sells glass they could cut it to size for you (if you wanted it toughened it would take longer). If the pi

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 11 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

Many years ago in a packet I found a walnut which was symmetrically divided into three sections, rather than the usual two (I've still got it). How could that have happened? I've never seen any other nut - walnut or otherwise - like th

Greenhouse louvre kit

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 11 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

I am looking to fit a louvred window into an old aluminium greenhouse that uses standard Dutch lights as the side panels. But I can only find louvre kits for ~24" wide panels. Don't they make greenhouses to take Dutch lights any more? Alter

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 21 Hours ago by: Stewart Robert Hinsl

Many years ago I had a snapdragon with 3 leaves at each node.

Re: Felco secateurs - which model for general pruning? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 8 Days 2 Hours ago by: David Rance

I've used a No. 8 for the last thirty years or so. Still as good as the day I bought it. I've also got a No. 9 (Left-handed) which I bought by mistake. Both excellent for general work. David

Felco secateurs - which model for general pruning?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 8 Days 4 Hours ago by: David

Having been tempted by Charlie Pridham I am now considering a pair of Felco secateurs. However there seems to be endless choice. I think I need them for small to medium thickness - that is thinner than when you start to reach for the lo

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 8 Days 11 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

I have seen that a few times. I don't know the reason that some beeches are copper, but seems to be a fairly common variation in 'wild' beeches. Remember that many woodlands are based around a core of planted trees - we have almost no v

Re: Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 1 Hour ago by: Chris Hogg

I should hang on to a leaf or two - they may be lucky, like a four-leaf clover! :-)

Dicotyledons & Tricotyledons

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 1 Hour ago by: Martin Brown

Every now and then in plants with enormous numbers of seedlings I see a first seed leaf "pair" that is in fact a triplicate. They don't seem to survive for very long. I have seen it with sycamore and most recently with beetroot. I'll try

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 4 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Thanks Stewart - pollen on the wind sounds the most likely answer, because the leaf colour is rather pale and washed-out for a 'good' copper beech.

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 6 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

I find oak seedlings everywhere. I have one mature oak tree (probably several hundred years old) and one I have nurtured for the last 30 years which is probably a youthful 40-50 years old. They are 200 yards apart. So however it happens

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 8 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

It could just be a novel seed off a "standard" beech. After all, that's how nearly all these varieties start. How it got there is anybody's guess. Do squirrels bury beech mast? I'd have thought it was hardly worth their while as they a

Re: Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 8 Hours ago by: Stewart Robert Hinsl

"Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast?" Yes and no - the offspring of a copper beech are likely to have some degree of purple colouration (that's how we ended up with 'Dawyck Purple') but they can't be relied on to be the sa

Do copper beech trees come true from beech mast?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 9 Days 8 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

I ask because I volunteer with a local woodland conservation group, and amongst the trees of several species (birch, beech, oak, chestnut etc) is a solitary copper beech, probably about twenty or thirty years old. We were wondering how it g

Re: Secateurs - are Spear and Jackson still a good name? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 10 Days 22 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

expensive yes but I am still on the pair I treated myself to in 1987

Re: Tomatoes under a carport (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 8 Hours ago by: David

We gave up on growing tomatoes outdoors because of blight. However the last few years we have grown cherry tomatoes under a polycarbonate roof (over our decking) and they seem to be generally blight free. This is a South facing deck,

Re: Secateurs - are Spear and Jackson still a good name? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 8 Hours ago by: David

I might be if I felt rich! Cheers Dave R -- AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 9 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Certainly spreading a mixture over 1Kg seems a more reasonable amount, with some hope of dividing it into a least two "runs" and adjusting the rate if it looks like it might run out too quickly

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 10 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

Well, there are always pros and cons! But birds seem to know what to reject - they most certainly open sunflower seeds and allow the hard coat to fall away. The fussy little goldfinches even carefully remove the soft covering of sunflo

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 12 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

£1.29 for 750g from H&B, I've got 350g of seed, so that'd allow about a 2:1 mix with the seeds, thanks ... will probably attract more birds!

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 13 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

It's more expensive than sand, but crushed bran breakfast cereal will have the same density as seeds - more or less. You could try mixing the seeds with that.

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 14 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

yay ... yes, I'd already bought some sand, still a bit worried that the sand and smaller seeds will sink in the hopper leaving the larger seeds floating on top and not spreading evenly. Not very keen on marking out 140 squares indi

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 7 Hours ago by: Janet

In article <jduilpFmrv8U1@mid.individual.net>, usenet@andyburns.uk says... Mix the WF seed well with a larger weight of sand . Then you can easily judge the even coverage of sand (light colour) scattered over a square metre of eart

Re: Wildflower meadow (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 12 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Having rotavated it back in Feb when it was quite wet, it set into hard clods, only a few weeds poked through and no "bad" ones, so I sprayed them off a couple of weeks ago. We didn't really get much frost to break the soil down, and

Re: Secateurs - are Spear and Jackson still a good name? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 23 Hours ago by: Vir Campestris

My mother bought me two pairs, a big one and a small one. My wife really liked the small ones, suited her hand size, but they vanished. We suspect into the council green bin :( There's something to be said for not spending too much...

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 23 Hours ago by: Vir Campestris

Hope you get well soon. I picked up something after our office Christmas party (which was at Easter...). I tested negative 4 times (LF), though other people there tested positive. I'm still coughing a month later. It's only annoying (

Re: Tomatoes under a carport (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 13 Days 1 Hour ago by: John P

Thanks all for your replies. I'm between Milton Keynes and Bedford, so the average temp is a little colder than in London. As the carport is too small to be used as one I'll try the toms under there and hope for the best.

Re: Tomatoes under a carport (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 13 Days 3 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

It doesn't help much this year but as someone who for the last 40 years has failed to get any Tomato plants to survive outside because of blight, last year I tried 'Crimson Crush' said to be blight resistant. Wonder of wonders they wer

Re: Tomatoes under a carport (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 13 Days 22 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

It would help a little as it would stop blight spores in the air being washed onto the plants by rain. Even better would be if you could make some temporary "walls" of polythene, Anything which helps impair the blight spores from getti

Re: Tomatoes under a carport (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 13 Days 23 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

It is hard to say. Mine got blight outdoors late in the season as did the spuds but a fair proportion were OK. You definitely get a much better crop in the greenhouse but that is from the warmth. It depends so much on the weather and

Tomatoes under a carport

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days ago by: John P

Last year all my toms got trashed by blight. I don't have a greenhouse to grow them in, so would growing them in growbags under my carport prevent the blight this year? My carport which is too small for today's cars has a twinwall polyc

Re: spiral/expandable hose for outside tap. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days ago by: John P

My daughter bought a job lot of Hozelock expandable hoses that were Screwfix customer returns to sell on ebay. Half of them had burst, and I think the reason for that is people don't know how to use them. She gave me one of them last

Blue danube potatoes

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days 2 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

Oh dear. I tried them last year, and they grew well, cropped well, and (subject to provisos below) made good baked potatoes. But their skins are too tough to mash them unpeeled, a lot of them had brown areas inside, and they were absolut

Re: Bougainvillea and systemic insecticide (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days 5 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

Ours keep their leaves at minimums of +1c but dont forget most Bougainvilla are the result of hybrids between the 3 main species so it very much depends on which one you have, - they are not all created equal. our main plant is a vibra

Re: Secateurs - are Spear and Jackson still a good name? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days 6 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

I am a Felco man my self!

Re: Tomatoes in growbags (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days 6 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

Also using Leveingtons, but I should add this is the first time I have ever tried bags, bag markings indicate 3 plants per bag so thats what I went with

Re: spiral/expandable hose for outside tap. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 14 Days 10 Hours ago by: Mike Rogers

Previous owners of our house left one for us. Its at least four years old (that's how long we have been here) and still in good usable condition. However its an untidy thing that doesn't recoil neatly but just sprawls all over the plac

Re: spiral/expandable hose for outside tap. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 4 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Dad had one, it was crap (maybe it was cheap, i don't know) bore was under 1/4" so particularly rubbish for car washing, had a bit of a mind of its own.

Re: Acer Palmatum Dissectum (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 4 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Went down today, most of the aphidthings have left or been picked off, but the spindles are *really* dry, this years leaves drop if you brush past them.

Re: Tomatoes in growbags (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 9 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

You always need to feed tomato plants though irrespective of the growing medium or they will quickly run out of steam.

Re: spiral/expandable hose for outside tap. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 12 Hours ago by: alan_m

The expandable ones (that change length) will only last a very short time! The hose inside the nylon covering is very thin as it needs to stretch, but splits easily. They don't like being taken around the sharp corner of a wall etc. N

Re: Tomatoes in growbags (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 12 Hours ago by: Bob Hobden

Using the Levingtons peat free ones this year, much better than others I've tried. They seem to have nutrients in them.

Re: spiral/expandable hose for outside tap. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 12 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

I had one, many years ago. IIRC it was a pain to use, but can't now remember details. I've stayed with conventional hoses, rubber or reinforced braided PVC ever since.

Tomatoes in growbags

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 15 Days 12 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Recommendations for growbags please, or any to avoid. I have a Dobbies near me, but some supermarkets and DIY sheds also sell them. How may plants per bag, vine tomatoes (picobella, a variety of piccolo cherry types I believe)?

Re: Acer Palmatum Dissectum (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 16 Days 2 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

Spindles and sweet gum, the former seem to be most affected, they're also looking thirstiest, running repairs to irrigation timer now completed ... There are other, more established, trees around not looked at those ...

Re: Out-of-date finishing plaster to improve clay soil? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 16 Days 6 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

Unless you have some extreme calcifuges, it won't make enough difference to matter - and, even then, it would matter only if you piled it over their roots. Scattered over a wider area, it will do no harm (and only a little good), but it'

spiral/expandable hose for outside tap.

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 16 Days 9 Hours ago by: Janet

I'm thinking of buying one of these, to use for lazy watering pots and washing the car. 15 m length will be plenty. When not in use it's required to lie down, curl up and stay discreetly out of sight behind a border of enthusias

Unusual whitefly infestation

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 16 Days 11 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

I have a fairly old Aeonium 'Zwartkop' in the conservatory. It has been pest-free for years, but a week ago got smothered in whitefly. I'm surprised they could get through the tough outer coat of the succulent leaves. I did a quick spray

Re: Acer Palmatum Dissectum (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 16 Days 11 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

What sort of trees? Most trees are plenty vigorous enough to support sap sucking pests and the ladybirds and blue tits will take care of them.

Re: Out-of-date finishing plaster to improve clay soil? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 17 Days 5 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

It ought to work to flocculate clay but it might also shift the pH towards alkaline in the process. Proper horticultural gypsum ought to be roughly pH neutral but builders plaster tends to be a bit more alkaline. Try it on a patch of b

Re: Out-of-date finishing plaster to improve clay soil? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days ago by: Chris J Dixon

Gypsum is recommended as a soil improver where clay is present, but appears to be sold in garden centres as a proprietary product costing over £6 for 2.5 kg. On the other hand, I picked up a 25 kg bag of multi-finish plaster for under

Re: Acer Palmatum Dissectum (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days ago by: Andy Burns

Went down to my plot at the weekend, most of the trees have the newest inch or two of growth covered in tiny black bugs ... must go spray them this weekend,

Out-of-date finishing plaster to improve clay soil?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 4 Hours ago by: nothanks

I have a couple of bags of plaster to ditch and I've read differing views about whether it can be used to improve clay soil so ... do I take it to the dump or dig it into the soil or the huge piles of grass cuttings and leaves?

Secateurs - are Spear and Jackson still a good name?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 6 Hours ago by: David

I'm contemplating buying a new set of secateurs with a (leather?) holster and Spear & Jackson seem to be affordable. They used to be a premium brand. Are they still good, or has the brand been sold on? Cheers Dave R -- AMD FX-6300

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 6 Hours ago by: David

Finally we have some rain! -- AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

Re: Bougainvillea and systemic insecticide (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 6 Hours ago by: David

Seemed to be blackfly and whitefly. Previous years (and previous Bougainvillea) we have left them out in shelter over winter. We have discarded plants because they appeared dead. Last year we had the apparently dead again, but there wa

Re: Bougainvillea and systemic insecticide (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 20 Days 23 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

You don't say which particular pests are causing you problems? Red spider is the easiest to deal with as the biological control mites mop up the problem very quickly, Aphids water with a few drops of washing up liquid plus planting or

Re: Hippeastrum care after flowering (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 20 Days 23 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

I simple ignore ours until all is brown and crispy, 15 years on and still in the same pot and compost they flower wonderfully every year with no attention from me!

Re: Whither the Gardeners? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 22 Days 21 Hours ago by: Bob Hobden

The problems are that Hgs are not well known, Usenet certainly isn't, and it takes a bit of effort to get here. You have to find a server that still supports Usenet Ngs (Eternal September) register and then find a program to access them.

Whither the Gardeners?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 23 Days 9 Hours ago by: Another John

Like all Usenet groups, uk.rec.gardening has suffered a drop-off of contributors in recent years. Presumably, some have gone to web forums: does anyone have a recommendation? It will be hard, in a Web Forum, to find the consistently

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 23 Days 10 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

I agree. Although there does seem to be some reasonably secure evidence that Omicron is about a factor of two less deadly than Delta. eg. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.12.30.21268495v1 There have been larger studies sinc

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 4 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

Well be careful with causal links. It is also true that hospitals have a much better toolkit to treat covid. It is now almost down to 'no worse than a cold mostly, or perhaps a flu in special cases'

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 10 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

That's OK. But I can answer it at least in part. The waning of acquired immunity to all coronavirus infections in general (~10 months) and Covid-19 in particular (~3 months) is rather fast. However, if you have been infected once then

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 25 Days 22 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

I meant "you" as in anyone, not "you" specifically ...

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 26 Days 3 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

The table7 that he shows on screen claims to be from the 14th April report, but when I looked at that, Table7 was a totally different table, I tried 3 previous weeks and a week in march and didn't find the table he was referencing. G

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 26 Days 4 Hours ago by: David

Farmers are out today irrigating like mad. -- AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 26 Days 10 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

Nor here any more. time for a hosepipe methinks

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 26 Days 12 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

Figure 16 in this gives you everything you need to call him out as a lying paranoid charlatan. Deliberate misrepresentation of genuine information intended to cost lives by sowing doubt about vaccines. https://assets.publishing.service

Re: Hippeastrum care after flowering (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days ago by: Martin Brown

As long as you don't let it set seed I doubt that it matters. Like you I'm inclined to think the stem is able to photosynthesise. I put mine outside once danger of frost is over.

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days ago by: Rob H

No rain forecast for the foreseable future in West Yorks.

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days 2 Hours ago by: David

Nowhere near me, though. -- AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

Re: Rain, rain go away! Come again another day. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days 3 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

A little popped up today here (suffolk)

Hippeastrum care after flowering

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days 3 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

The flowers on my two hippeastrums are fading, and I've already cut off one lot. But that leaves me with a tall and substantial stem. The articles on hippeastrum care on the 'net say to cut the stem off at the same time as you cut the dying

Rain, rain go away! Come again another day.

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days 4 Hours ago by: David

I'm sorry. I didn't mean it. It's me, not you. Can we try again? Put the past behind us? I never realised how much I needed you until you left me. {Sniff} I know you have other friends. I can see you every day on the radar. Please come ba

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 2 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

On GBNEWS, who knows? I looked into that when data started to be published, before the vaccines were available and during lockdown, and the death rate from COVID was almost exactly pro rata to the death rate from all causes. As vaccinat

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 20 Hours ago by: Stewart Robert Hinsl

I've seen it said that vaccination reduces your risks from COVID-19 to that of a person 30 years younger. By that rule of thumb, a vaccinated 90 year old would be at the same risk as an unvaccinated 60 year old, and considerably greate

Re: Industrial Chemical used to sweeten growing Fruit. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 23 Hours ago by: David Rance

Why do I think this chap is a troll? David

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