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sport / alt.sports.basketball.nba.gs-warriors / BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion

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* BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosionAllen
`- Re: BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosionRobin Miller

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BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion

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From: ala...@yahoo.com (Allen)
Newsgroups: alt.sports.basketball.nba.gs-warriors
Subject: BANG:_Warriors_adjusting_to_officiating_changes_amid_NB
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 by: Allen - Tue, 12 Mar 2024 23:15 UTC

Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion
Foul calls are down since the All-Star break, though the NBA won't admit
a change in emphasis. It could play to the Warriors' advantage.

>Golden State Warriors’ Draymond Green (23) argues with a referee in
the second quarter of a NBA game at Chase Center against the Milwaukee
Bucks in San Francisco, Calif., on Wednesday, March 6, 2024. (Ray
Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

Danny Emerman is a Bay Area News Group sports reporter
By DANNY EMERMAN | demerman@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: March 12, 2024 at 1:05 p.m. | UPDATED: March 12, 2024 at 3:44
p.m.
https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2024/03/12/warriors-adjusting-to-officiating-changes-amid-nbas-scoring-explosion/

The 2016-17 Warriors, a superteam built around Steph Curry and Kevin
Durant, led one of the most efficient offenses in NBA history. Their
offensive rating of 115.6 that season is this year’s league average.

The Boston Celtics are on their way to a new NBA record for offensive
rating at 122.5, one year after the Sacramento Kings set the previous
record. At this pace, the best offense in any given season is likely to
become the most efficient in league history.

Teams are averaging 115 points per game, 14 more than the league median
a decade ago. A number of factors have contributed to the years-long,
league-wide scoring boom, chief among them the 3-point revolution
started by Curry and the Warriors themselves.

Another major variable, though, is the way the game has been officiated.
There’s a sentiment within the league that the NBA has tilted the rules
and their enforcement too far in the direction of scoring. Players have
smartly geared their games to draw more fouls, often baiting officials
by initiating contact in clever ways to earn free throws — among the
most efficient ways to score.

“It’s never been easier to score in the league,” said Warriors assistant
coach and acclaimed defensive mind Ron Adams, echoing Steve Kerr’s
frustration earlier in the season.

But the pendulum could be swinging back toward an equilibrium. Since the
All-Star break, free throw rates and scoring overall have declined. The
76ers and Knicks combined for 152 points on Sunday night, the lowest
game total since 2016. Last Sunday, half of the 16 teams that played
failed to crack 100 points. Golden State scored a season-low 88 points
in Boston a week ago.

“Recently there’s been fewer garbage-type fouls,” Adams said. “Little
incidental stuff, they’re letting them play a little more one way or
another. I actually feel (recently) the balance has been a little better
with offense and defense. You’ve got to be on your toes.”

Although there haven’t been any midseason rule changes, referees
changing their tendencies isn’t unprecedented. Officials can tweak their
points of emphasis to reflect what they deem they are or aren’t doing
well. It’s understood that refs swallow their whistles more in the
postseason.

Draymond Green has noticed a change, and he’s not surprised.

“Yeah, that’s usually how it goes when it’s playoff time, preparing for
the playoffs,” Green said.

If the refs are going to let players get away with more physicality, the
Warriors (34-30) will have to contend with that environment. Even if
Kerr said they’re “not necessarily” better equipped to play in games
with fewer fouls, there’s evidence that they’re well prepared for that
style.

“We’re definitely not hurt by it because we don’t have anybody that’s
any good at flopping,” Kerr said.

The recent apparent change in officiating has been noted by national
pundits like Tom Haberstroh, Ethan Sherwood Strauss and Bill Simmons.
According to Action Network writer Matt Moore, foul rates on drives are
down by 11% since the All-Star break, and the top five teams in free
throw rate are down nearly 16%.

“I feel like we’ve had more games where the refs have let the teams play
a little bit, not call some of the ticky-tack stuff that was called
early on in the season,” Kerr said Monday. “I’ve enjoyed it.”

Adams, who has studied NBA box scores since he coached college ball in
the early ‘70s, said he’s amazed at some of the free throw totals this
year. Joel Embiid, Karl-Anthony Towns and Luka Doncic each scoring over
60 points in a single week was a flashpoint. They shot 23, 15 and 16
foul shots, respectively.

Weeks before, the Nuggets defeated the Warriors in part by winning the
free throw battle 32 to 23. The disparity was especially stark in the
second half, irking Kerr: “It’s a parade to the free throw line, and
it’s disgusting to watch,” he said postgame.

“I have no problem with the officials themselves — all across the
league, we have really good officials,” Kerr said then. “I have a
problem with the way we’re legislating defense out of the game. That’s
what we’re doing in the NBA. The way we’re teaching the officials, we’re
just enabling players to BS their way to the foul line. If I were a fan,
I wouldn’t have wanted to watch the second half of that game.”

Before the All-Star break, the Warriors ranked 20th in defensive rating
at 116.6. In 11 games since the break, in which more physical play is
apparently being permitted, they rank sixth (109.0).

That improvement has also coincided with rotation changes such as
replacing Klay Thompson with Brandin Podziemski in the starting lineup,
playing Draymond Green exclusively at center and giving Trayce
Jackson-Davis a bigger role. But Golden State appears to be adapting
well to the officiating tendencies.

Adams and the coaching staff always have a lot on their plate in terms
of defensive scheming in the pace-and-space age. But the foundation of
any good defense, Adams said, is sound fundamentals, succinct rules to
follow and personnel committed to playing aggressively.

The most important, and toughest to acquire, is the third factor:
personnel. In Green, Jackson-Davis, Jonathan Kuminga, Moses Moody, Gary
Payton II and Andrew Wiggins, the Warriors have a solid core of
athletic, heady defenders who should be capable of covering up for less
gifted defenders’ deficiencies.

If those types of players can get away with playing more physically, the
Warriors could alter their strategies.

“The league changes every few months, not even every season,” Adams
said. “And so you’re constantly trying to make these adjustments. Trying
to be innovative, think out of the box.”

Fewer called fouls could help Golden State defensively. One of the
Warriors’ biggest weaknesses defensively is sending too many opponents
to the foul line. They rank 23rd in opposing free throws attempted and
Kerr has routinely mentioned limiting fouls as the key to defensive
improvement. After the All-Star break, Golden State ranks eighth in
opponent free throws.

On the other side, teams are bound to be more handsy with Curry on the
perimeter. That could have an effect, especially with the two-time MVP
coming off a sprained right ankle, but it won’t be novel to Curry, who
has dealt with every brand of defensive pressure throughout his 15-year
career.

Curry in particular and the Warriors in general don’t rely on getting to
the line to score. A player like Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who takes four
more free throws per game than Curry (who ranks 40th in attempts per
game) could be more impacted by a quieter whistle.

On Monday night in San Antonio, Green, Kuminga and Podziemski at various
points threw their arms up in disbelief after their drives to the basket
through contact went uncalled — when the same plays very well could have
been whistled dead a couple months ago. But on the other end, Green and
Jackson-Davis could be more physical with Victor Wembanyama, bodying him
off his spot and challenging him tougher at the rim.

At least for one Warrior, more aggression is always good.

“Of course,” Green said when asked if he had noticed a change in
officiating. “I love it.”

While the league might believe that more scoring is the most
fan-friendly brand of basketball, Adams holds that the game is at its
best when there’s more of a balance between offense and defense. So
might the Warriors.

Re: BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion

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From: robin.mi...@invalid.invalid (Robin Miller)
Newsgroups: alt.sports.basketball.nba.gs-warriors
Subject: Re:_BANG:_Warriors_adjusting_to_officiating_changes_amid_
NBA’s_scoring_explosion
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 by: Robin Miller - Wed, 13 Mar 2024 01:47 UTC

Allen wrote:
> Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion
> Foul calls are down since the All-Star break, though the NBA won't admit
> a change in emphasis. It could play to the Warriors' advantage.
>
> >Golden State Warriors’ Draymond Green (23) argues with a referee in
> the second quarter of a NBA game at Chase Center against the Milwaukee
> Bucks in San Francisco, Calif., on Wednesday, March 6, 2024. (Ray
> Chavez/Bay Area News Group)
>
> Danny Emerman is a Bay Area News Group sports reporter
> By DANNY EMERMAN | demerman@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
> PUBLISHED: March 12, 2024 at 1:05 p.m. | UPDATED: March 12, 2024 at 3:44
> p.m.
> https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2024/03/12/warriors-adjusting-to-officiating-changes-amid-nbas-scoring-explosion/
>
>
>
> The 2016-17 Warriors, a superteam built around Steph Curry and Kevin
> Durant, led one of the most efficient offenses in NBA history. Their
> offensive rating of 115.6 that season is this year’s league average.
>
> The Boston Celtics are on their way to a new NBA record for offensive
> rating at 122.5, one year after the Sacramento Kings set the previous
> record. At this pace, the best offense in any given season is likely to
> become the most efficient in league history.
>
> Teams are averaging 115 points per game, 14 more than the league median
> a decade ago. A number of factors have contributed to the years-long,
> league-wide scoring boom, chief among them the 3-point revolution
> started by Curry and the Warriors themselves.
>
> Another major variable, though, is the way the game has been officiated.
> There’s a sentiment within the league that the NBA has tilted the rules
> and their enforcement too far in the direction of scoring. Players have
> smartly geared their games to draw more fouls, often baiting officials
> by initiating contact in clever ways to earn free throws — among the
> most efficient ways to score.
>
> “It’s never been easier to score in the league,” said Warriors assistant
> coach and acclaimed defensive mind Ron Adams, echoing Steve Kerr’s
> frustration earlier in the season.
>
> But the pendulum could be swinging back toward an equilibrium. Since the
> All-Star break, free throw rates and scoring overall have declined. The
> 76ers and Knicks combined for 152 points on Sunday night, the lowest
> game total since 2016. Last Sunday, half of the 16 teams that played
> failed to crack 100 points. Golden State scored a season-low 88 points
> in Boston a week ago.
>
> “Recently there’s been fewer garbage-type fouls,” Adams said. “Little
> incidental stuff, they’re letting them play a little more one way or
> another. I actually feel (recently) the balance has been a little better
> with offense and defense. You’ve got to be on your toes.”
>
> Although there haven’t been any midseason rule changes, referees
> changing their tendencies isn’t unprecedented. Officials can tweak their
> points of emphasis to reflect what they deem they are or aren’t doing
> well. It’s understood that refs swallow their whistles more in the
> postseason.
>
> Draymond Green has noticed a change, and he’s not surprised.
>
> “Yeah, that’s usually how it goes when it’s playoff time, preparing for
> the playoffs,” Green said.
>
> If the refs are going to let players get away with more physicality, the
> Warriors (34-30) will have to contend with that environment. Even if
> Kerr said they’re “not necessarily” better equipped to play in games
> with fewer fouls, there’s evidence that they’re well prepared for that
> style.
>
> “We’re definitely not hurt by it because we don’t have anybody that’s
> any good at flopping,” Kerr said.
>
> The recent apparent change in officiating has been noted by national
> pundits like Tom Haberstroh, Ethan Sherwood Strauss and Bill Simmons.
> According to Action Network writer Matt Moore, foul rates on drives are
> down by 11% since the All-Star break, and the top five teams in free
> throw rate are down nearly 16%.
>
> “I feel like we’ve had more games where the refs have let the teams play
> a little bit, not call some of the ticky-tack stuff that was called
> early on in the season,” Kerr said Monday. “I’ve enjoyed it.”
>
> Adams, who has studied NBA box scores since he coached college ball in
> the early ‘70s, said he’s amazed at some of the free throw totals this
> year. Joel Embiid, Karl-Anthony Towns and Luka Doncic each scoring over
> 60 points in a single week was a flashpoint. They shot 23, 15 and 16
> foul shots, respectively.
>
> Weeks before, the Nuggets defeated the Warriors in part by winning the
> free throw battle 32 to 23. The disparity was especially stark in the
> second half, irking Kerr: “It’s a parade to the free throw line, and
> it’s disgusting to watch,” he said postgame.
>
> “I have no problem with the officials themselves — all across the
> league, we have really good officials,” Kerr said then. “I have a
> problem with the way we’re legislating defense out of the game. That’s
> what we’re doing in the NBA. The way we’re teaching the officials, we’re
> just enabling players to BS their way to the foul line. If I were a fan,
> I wouldn’t have wanted to watch the second half of that game.”
>
> Before the All-Star break, the Warriors ranked 20th in defensive rating
> at 116.6. In 11 games since the break, in which more physical play is
> apparently being permitted, they rank sixth (109.0).
>
> That improvement has also coincided with rotation changes such as
> replacing Klay Thompson with Brandin Podziemski in the starting lineup,
> playing Draymond Green exclusively at center and giving Trayce
> Jackson-Davis a bigger role. But Golden State appears to be adapting
> well to the officiating tendencies.
>
> Adams and the coaching staff always have a lot on their plate in terms
> of defensive scheming in the pace-and-space age. But the foundation of
> any good defense, Adams said, is sound fundamentals, succinct rules to
> follow and personnel committed to playing aggressively.
>
> The most important, and toughest to acquire, is the third factor:
> personnel. In Green, Jackson-Davis, Jonathan Kuminga, Moses Moody, Gary
> Payton II and Andrew Wiggins, the Warriors have a solid core of
> athletic, heady defenders who should be capable of covering up for less
> gifted defenders’ deficiencies.
>
> If those types of players can get away with playing more physically, the
> Warriors could alter their strategies.
>
> “The league changes every few months, not even every season,” Adams
> said. “And so you’re constantly trying to make these adjustments. Trying
> to be innovative, think out of the box.”
>
> Fewer called fouls could help Golden State defensively. One of the
> Warriors’ biggest weaknesses defensively is sending too many opponents
> to the foul line. They rank 23rd in opposing free throws attempted and
> Kerr has routinely mentioned limiting fouls as the key to defensive
> improvement. After the All-Star break, Golden State ranks eighth in
> opponent free throws.
>
> On the other side, teams are bound to be more handsy with Curry on the
> perimeter. That could have an effect, especially with the two-time MVP
> coming off a sprained right ankle, but it won’t be novel to Curry, who
> has dealt with every brand of defensive pressure throughout his 15-year
> career.
>
> Curry in particular and the Warriors in general don’t rely on getting to
> the line to score. A player like Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who takes four
> more free throws per game than Curry (who ranks 40th in attempts per
> game) could be more impacted by a quieter whistle.
>
> On Monday night in San Antonio, Green, Kuminga and Podziemski at various
> points threw their arms up in disbelief after their drives to the basket
> through contact went uncalled — when the same plays very well could have
> been whistled dead a couple months ago. But on the other end, Green and
> Jackson-Davis could be more physical with Victor Wembanyama, bodying him
> off his spot and challenging him tougher at the rim.
>
> At least for one Warrior, more aggression is always good.
>
> “Of course,” Green said when asked if he had noticed a change in
> officiating. “I love it.”
>
> While the league might believe that more scoring is the most
> fan-friendly brand of basketball, Adams holds that the game is at its
> best when there’s more of a balance between offense and defense. So
> might the Warriors.


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sport / alt.sports.basketball.nba.gs-warriors / BANG: Warriors adjusting to officiating changes amid NBA’s scoring explosion

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