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Chinese music scale, instruments from Mesopotamia

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 15 Hours 2 Minutes ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?pT678

Re: THE SHELTERED APE (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 2 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Highly unusual (i.e. almost unknown) behaviour for a terrestrial animal. Yet standard for an ape. This peculiarity of apes calls for an explanation. The normality of human behaviour -- within that of apes generally -- shows that human

Re: THE SHELTERED APE (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 7 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Our rudimentary aquatic bearing due to : Ads·Shop your inner fish Image of Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body $1

Re: THE SHELTERED APE (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Present-day humans are clearly not aquatic at all today, and many humans are afraid of drowning. Most older people in my village can't even swim & never swam. I needed special lessons before I learned to swim at 10 or 12 years, and I wa

Re: sheltering from rain (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Sulawesi weather Aug 2018: 6 rainy days, often cloudy, he could store rain from roof. Guam weather Aug 2018 https://www.timeanddate.com/weather/usa/guam-hagatna/historic?month=8&year 18 Of course without shelter, he'd be sharkbait.

THE SHELTERED APE (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Thanks, it merely confirms the obvious, humans can live anywhere if they have shelter!! He'll never return to the dangerous sea but sleeps every night in a shelter, just like all Homo sapiens.

savanna running

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 1 Day 23 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-45649012

Woolly pigs

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 2 Days 4 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://preservingouranimalsinthewild.quora.com/The-Mangalica-also-known-as-the-sheep-pig-is-the-last-pig-breed-in-existence-to-have-a-thick-curly-coat-of-hair-Ev?ch&oidg250079&share7350be&srid=RPhZF&target_type=post Woolly mammoth Wooll

Re: Chimpanzee language (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 3 Days 1 Hour ago by: I Envy JTEM

One screaming obvious problem is that this isn't legitimate science. I mean, there's no baseline. You'd have to do the exact same analysis on virtually every species in order to determine what is genuinely interesting here. We know we'

Fire arch., Kidneys, Blades

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 3 Days 19 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-022-01759-2.epdf?sharing_tokenyA5ORTJFZvCZn1VN-nKVdRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0P8GEqw2ApdxOZTChicD5-WpJIjTllhRtymJJxmR4OGAAMcDKWyKWQLGzhSnYJELZw1ShbvndQWuMz1ki4Gw5fUdsnxAlYqYpFTQaPD--hJvebf16EQpud-hYwr4xKj3eQ%

Chimpanzee language

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 3 Days 21 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Chimpanzees produce diverse vocal sequences with ordered and recombinatorial properties Open paper https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-022-03350-8 Abstract The origins of human language remains a major question in evolutionary scienc

Re: Origin of complex human birth pattern (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 3 Days 23 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Chimp infants are precocious enough to be able to hold onto their mothers (with no assistance from the mother) immediately after birth. They also quickly learn how climb independently, so that when threatened by a leopard at night the

Re: Possible Denisovan tooth found in Laos 131 to 164 kya (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 4 Days 21 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Honestly. They won't publish anything pertaining to paleo anthropology unless the writer has first consumed BUCKETS of paint chips... The picture humans spreading like a ball where they begin at Point-A then pack up everything and walk

Re: Can we INFER the invention of shoes? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 4 Days 22 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

The real question here is if they could have been knapping all these hyper sharp bits onto the ground if they didn't have shoes? Whether they developed foot coverings first or came up with them in response to shredding their feet & toe

Possible Denisovan tooth found in Laos 131 to 164 kya

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 4 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/denisovan-girl-fossil-tooth-hominid-laos-anthropology A Denisovan girl’s fossil tooth may have been unearthed in Laos A molar adds to suspicions that the mysterious hominids inhabited Southeast Asia'

Re: WHAT talk Chris Knight (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

On Friday, May 13, 2022 at 5:52:58 PM UTC-4, DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves wrote:

Re: Origin of complex human birth pattern (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

This comment refers to a post at AAT.io about SIDS Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and new information about an enzyme. I note that when Homo split from arboreal apes, sleeping mother and infant apes were in physical contact all night but sle

Re: Origin of complex human birth pattern (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Chimp infants are vastly more altricial vs most mammals and birds. Apith infants were certainly very altricial. Primate

House mouse in Azores Isles in Central Atlantic: from Vikings, Basques?

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/OE_tmd1PI-Y

Re: Can we INFER the invention of shoes? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days ago by: Primum Sapienti

Not necessarily, if they already had foot wear of some kind. No. Have you ever watched someone knapping, or at least a video or two? Here's a decent one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nJKqNjXDkU Living in the Stone Age: Flint Knappi

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days 2 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Why not inform a *little* bit before trying to say something?? The littoral theory prefectly explains eccrine glands as well as hair distributions, e.g. my paper 1987 Med.Hypoth.24:293-9 "The aquatic ape theory and some common diseases

Re: WHAT talk Chris Knight (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 6 Days 2 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Not at all, on the contrary: read our paper.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 7 Days 3 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

I have often -- and for many years -- argued the opposite. Feather Like Thingies (which is a technical term) or, if you prefer, proto feathers, seem to appear as far back as we can ascertain! They predate flight by an extremely long ti

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 11 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Re: Ostrich bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 21 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Hummingbirds do?

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 21 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

?? Gathering seaweed, oysters, mushrooms, pineapples...

Re: WHAT talk Chris Knight (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 21 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

You confuse vocalization (parrots, walrus) with complex coded language (human script).

Sundarban tigers are smaller than Sumatran tigers

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 21 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/u4mwuvdnxHs

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 8 Days 23 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

I wouldn't usually be bothered replying to your posts. But there's an interesting point below. Flight is often disadvantageous to birds on oceanic islands. They are liable to be blown away in strong winds, and never get back. So

Re: WHAT talk Chris Knight (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 9 Days ago by: littor...@gmail.com

For understanding speech evolution, google "Seafood, Diving, Song and Speech".

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 9 Days ago by: littor...@gmail.com

My little boy, - everybody knows this, - everybody also knows that this has 0 to do with pachyosteosclerosis as in H.erectus & slow-swahllo-diving marine tetrapods: POS or pachyosteosclerosis (extremely thick & heavy skeletons, possibly

Re: Ostrich bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 9 Days 3 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Yes, my boy, ostriches are bipedal runners... :-DDD Ostriches don't have POS. POS or pachyosteosclerosis (extremely thick & heavy skeletons, possibly more brittle due to an excess of calcium) in tetrapods is exclusively seen in slow &

Ancient calendar markers as "myths"

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 9 Days 8 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Kuphos = kyphos : hump, shieldborne aback kyphosis : humpback hunchback, bent forward rounded skyphos = scoop, drinking cup; shovel = lopar@Croatian I had these confused, but are simply inverting shield position from dome to bowl and bac

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 9 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/WNL9Jp9oeYA NA primates

Re: hominoid evolution & plate tectonics (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 10 Days 2 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Something that was always know. I mean, how can they evolve to endurance run by endurance running? It's circular. "People are well trained, not well informed." --The Book of JTEM I hate to quote myself (no I doubt) but the

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 10 Days 2 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

He/They/You/It/Them also say that a 4.8 point drop in I.Q.s is not a "Hurting" anyone, while nearly all of the human race agrees that anything dropping I.Q.s is a very bad thing... NOTE: The brain is composed of a large part by DHA, wh

hominoid evolution & plate tectonics

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 10 Days 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

- India approached Eurasia -> island arcs = mangrove forests: catarrhines that reached India became aquarboreal, google our TREE paper "Aquarboreal Ancestors?". - India further underneath Eurasia -> split lesser (E) & great apes (W). - Grea

Re: Origin of complex human birth pattern (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 10 Days 21 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

They should also have concluded that australopiths could not have slept in trees -- the usual assumption of standard PA -- since all other primate infants (whose mothers sleep in trees) are not altricial. Primate infants need to be able

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 10 Days 21 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Thanks. Good point. It seems that if it's done early enough (i.e. before ~6 years old) then the effective removal of half of the brain often has no, or little, effect.

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Meaning, what? Mushrooms don't dive so we don't need to? What do you think you're saying here? Not that I believe you capable of fully articulating an idea but, well, I have to admit it would be fun to watch you try.

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Speech isn't needed. No other species has a language. Mathematics isn't needed. Goats, bears & chimps don't carry calculators or scribble equations in the dirt. We don't need these things. And the fact that we don't need them, we never "

Re: Chimp stick "sword fighting" (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

You don't seem to know how to deconstruct a problem, ascertain what is or isn't critical, and I have to admit that I find this hilarious. EVERYONE agrees on coastal dispersal. It's the very method everyone agrees was used to spread our g

Re: Lack of seafood IS NOT HURTING PEOPLE right now (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

https://groups.google.com/g/sci.anthropology.paleo/c/E2G1SI0Illk/m/4RT9ELC0BAAJ There you go; proof that you are wrong, Wrong, WRONG and you can only wish you were as gifted as JTEM. No wonder you envy my! I can't fault you for that at

Re: Question only Dr Verhaegen (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Really? Because I imagine that there's a poop load of conditions/diseases that follow genetic heritage, mapping out migrations/multiregionalism. ...Native Americans, for example, are more prone to diabetes. African Americans a

Re: Shoulders delayed for birth (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 8 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Infantile shoulders external diameter vs Maternal pelvic internal diameter Regarding the twisting during birth

Re: Question only Dr Verhaegen (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

I'm sorry I can't help you much here... Op maandag 9 mei 2022 om 17:58:30 UTC+2 schreef I Envy JTEM:

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

The same idiots who believe their ancestors ran after antelopes over the African savanna also believe Inuit are H.erectus...

Re: Lack of seafood IS NOT HURTING PEOPLE right now (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Apparently those people the cite studied don't know they're supposed to be handicapped...

Re: Chimp stick "sword fighting" (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

That's the biggest whopper you stated yet...

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Diving not needed.

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Some bits here https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28561302/ Bone loss, traditional diet, and cold adaptation in Arctic populations https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1094695006603363 Ethnic Differences in Bone Mineral D

Re: Ostrich bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Ostriches are bipedal runners.

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Diving not needed.

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density, diving not needed.

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Sweating results from physical exertion, like running. We are runners. Even little kids run. AA can't explain head hair or sweating. Or even other locations for body hair - which don't appear until puberty.

Re: Shoulders delayed for birth (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Interesting catch. Easier to use form of the link <https://www.newscientist.com/article/2315684-shoulder-growth-may-slow-during-human-development-to-make-birth-easier/> The paper is here https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.21149

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Look up hemispherectomies. There's probably some variations on the procedure.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

It's necessary when one rejects "Intelligent Design." If evolution is not directed, if aliens or a divine being do not decide evolution then attributing motives as you demand is stupid. It really is stupid.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

It's kind of like "Arguing" that flightless birds can't exist because flying is so awesome. Flightless birds do exist. Humans are the Aquatic Ape. Even the Out of Africa purists admit it -- even if they sometimes realize what that means

Re: Sunda ice age atlas video (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

No, you're describing it as if Denisovans were a ball rolling west to east. You've got to think of it more like spilled paint. It spreads out, covers an area, and then in order to get to anywhere on the other side you have to walk throu

Re: Sunda ice age atlas video (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 15 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

I don't know why so many of these sources get it wrong -- it seems intentional -- but we are not technically in an ice age, this is an ice age. What people think of as "The" ice age was the most recent of many glacial periods, and there w

Re: Sunda ice age atlas video (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 22 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

- Denisovans crossed Wallace Line, contributed to AmerIndians, not FLores. 5.5m https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg0Z3LappEM

Sunda ice age atlas video

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 22 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg0Z3LappEM 9m30s

Milo: 27ka Prince of Spain

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 11 Days 23 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2vuL3oZogc Good video by Stephan Milo on ice age Europe at 5 minutes, hand painted stencils on cave walls, child prints: carried by parent or piggyback? How could they blow the paint on the child's hand if

Michel Odent 2021 Planet Ocean

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 12 Days ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Here are some examples of questions raised in “Planet Ocean: our mysterious connections to water” (Michel Odent. Clairview 2021) -Why do human mammals need to learn techniques to be able to swim? -Why do seals go to dry land to give

Australia 65ka site

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 12 Days 4 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

65,000 years in Australia https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0277379122001299

Origin of complex human birth pattern

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 12 Days 4 Hours ago by: Pandora

Dynamic finite-element simulations reveal early origin of complex human birth pattern Abstract Human infants are born neurologically immature, potentially owing to conflicting selection pressures between bipedal locomotion and encephaliz

Re: Cliff climbing walrus (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 12 Days 20 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Cliff diving rather.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 12 Days 23 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Quote some good authority for this. If it was true, you would have quotes from the greats. I wasn't there (some 25 ma) so I have to speculate. Maybe this island had a lot of fairly horizontal lianas. The habitat probably didn't c

Cliff climbing walrus

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/yjzMHt5fEP4

Question only Dr Verhaegen

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 3 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

So I haven't been around as much online, mostly because I've been helping out with a friend diagnosed with Glioblastoma. Nasty business, that. So Googling it, I see that the usual life expectancy is around 15 months, while my friend has

Re: WHAT talk Chris Knight (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 4 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

I didn't see the Chris Knight zoomcast, but watched his older videos, my response to his contention that apes do not speak because they live in a brute environment, while humans speak because we live in a virtual environment: Language i

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 6 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

From Science. All scientists know this. Science explains how there are 2 tides, the natural processes involved, not why. Science explains how dinosaurs went extinct, not why. Since other primates don't, how did it's niche change to

Re: Cobalt in the Congo (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 7 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

You don't know Hunter Biden. https://nypost.com/2022/05/08/hollywood-lawyer-kevin-morris-paid-off-over-2m-of-hunter-bidens-taxes/ He'd sell his mother.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 8 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Where did you get that idea? The question "Why?" could hardly be more basic, e.g. : Why are there two tides every day? Why did the dinosaurs go extinct? The monkey began to brachiate. It wasn't much good at it to begin with, having a

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

That's why?? Science explores and tries to explain how, not why. How did it acquire these traits? it acquired Numerous monkey populations live on river and sea islands, they're monkeys which don't swing like apes, they swim fine. Tho

Archaic Homo slept in sand castles

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

DD: Did ancient Homo sleep in sand castles, or underwater like whales, or back floating like sea otters, or in sea caves like super furred sea lions, or in coco palms like coconut crabs or tucked in giant clamshells like little mermaids? I

Re: Photo of Gary Lesley (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 13 Days 16 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Not the wrong group. The wrong internet. You are lost again, toto.

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 14 Days 8 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

When you don't have an answer, admit it. It's interesting that when you don't have one (or, at least, an apparently viable hypothesis) the question does not occur to you. My answer here is that the first population of apes (hominoids)

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 14 Days 11 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

No, my boy, they become aquarboreal, of course... Don't you understand "coastal forests"?? Google our TREE paper "Aquarboreal Ancestors?".

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 14 Days 20 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Why did those catarrhines LOSE the inborn ability to swim -- present among ALL other primates and among almost ALL terrestrial mammals? Lesser apes AND great apes never recovered that instinctual capacity, even though (in your scena

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 15 Days 3 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

When India approached Eurasia, island arcs were formed = coastal forests. The catarrhines that reached these islands became the first hominoids, google our TREE paper "Aquarboreal Ancestors?". When India got further under Eurasia (Himalay

Re: Photo of Gary Lesley (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 15 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Sorry. wrong group. Though, maybe I can tie it in with arboreal primates?

Photo of Gary Lesley

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 15 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

https://uapro.tumblr.com/post/683517012143669248/gary-lesley So forging a link here; a chain linking one Gary Lesley Leslie RayRay Klondike Bar Lesley -- you know the one -- but a chain linking HIM to transdimensional tree stumps.

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 15 Days 22 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

That was my point. But the media was "Reporting" that if this "Doomsday Glacier" broke off & slid into the sea it might take a century or more for it to cause a rise in sea level. Oh, I'm sure you have. Many times. No need to be modes

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 16 Days ago by: Paul Crowley

Some glaciers/ ice-flows/ icebergs float in the sea; when they melt, there is no change in sea level. Glaciers above sea- level, that are resting on solid rock, also melt. Their melting (at rates above the formation of new ice from s

WHAT talk Chris Knight

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 16 Days 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Dear One and All, It gives me great pleasure to invite you all to the next WHAT (Waterside Hypotheses / Aquatic Theories) Talk. It the latest in our series of monthly free, live (but recorded), global Zoom talks about human evolution.

Re: Are saiga aquatic? Re: mv thinks erectus was a cetacean Re: Homo (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 17 Days 9 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

?? Why do you think that, my boy?? OI, BIG NOSE ! New Scientist 2782 p 69 Lastword 16 October 2010 Why do humans evolve external noses that don’t seem to serve any useful purpose – our smelling sensors are inside the head. Our nos

Body fat

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 17 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/1AMk3hWSCxc

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 2 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

I've mentioned it before, and no doubt you missed it, but often you (speaking rhetorically) can pass yourself off as more intelligent than you really are by merely being consistent. Stay with me here. It'll be worth it. Anyway, check t

Re: What "anamolous" NA finds? Re: Why erectus never made it to the Americas (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 2 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Gosh that's clever. Keep playing dumb! Lol! Notice how I politely said "Playing?"

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 3 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

N is a lot more than one. I quoted one case that happens to be in the news but, while such cases are rare, there are enough of them to prove the argument that "large brains" are not essential for perfectly normal human lives. Take a l

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

: until only about two to three million years ago, when representatives arrived in Asia, : and (as part of the Great American Interchange that followed the formation of the : Isthmus of Panama) South America So as I pointed out, and

Re: Expanded explorations of the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 5 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

You. Not "They": You. I said "Cool most air" and YOU decided that I said "There was water! There was so much water! There was a goddamn lake down there! They all drowned!" You did that. Right here. In this thread. And you're still doin

Re: Lack of seafood IS NOT HURTING PEOPLE right now (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 19 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

[....] Again, I began this thread with a cite which proved you wrong. At this point you're achieving nothing but casting yourself asa dumb troll.

Re: Chimp stick "sword fighting" (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 19 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Who cares? Aquatic Ape is accepted by everyone, even the Out of Africa purists. It's how our genus spread, it's WHY our genus spread. Do you honestly not know this? Are you genuinely incapable of discerning what is or is not relevant t

Re: Chimp stick "sword fighting" (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

AA "thinking" considers that a snorkel nose.

Re: Expanded explorations of the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

So you think they huffed and puffed and crawled into a tight hole to cool off? LOL

Re: Is THIS proof that monkeys originate in the Americas? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

THis is the link YOU posted, Jerm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelidae If you don't like the dating reported there then why did you rely on it? Why did you post the camel link then?

Re: Lack of seafood IS NOT HURTING PEOPLE right now (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Re: Are saiga aquatic? Re: mv thinks erectus was a cetacean Re: Homo (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 22 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Are saiga aquatic?

Re: What "anamolous" NA finds? Re: Why erectus never made it to the (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 18 Days 23 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

What "anamolous" NA finds?

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 13 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Do the Google on the human brain & Omega-3s, what percentage is comprised of DHA, specifically. My switching to a diet far richer in Omega-3s than their terrestrial counterparts, their brains were assured to grow to the maximum extant

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 17 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Oops, I meant "I *wouldn't* equal brain to stomach..."

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 17 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Shouldn't this be for bigger stomach? I mean, I would equal brain to stomach just like that. Do you think brain is just like a stomach? So, what if I eat McDonalds, will this enlarge my left ear?

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 18 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

We know why they grew bigger brains: They changed to a diet rich in brain-building Omega-3s.

Re: Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 18 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Lol, bravo. Of course, this isn't scientifically relevant because n = 1. I mean, how can some sane person, with a full working brain say such a stupid thing. Yet, the science is stupid, what can you do, lol.

Re: Borneo rainforests unchanged for 5,000,000 years (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 19 Days 21 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Again; the planet was overall cooler, all the new land mass changed the ocean and air currents -- HOW THE PLANET DISTRIBUTES THE ENERGY FROM THE SUN -- and it's virtually impossible for it to have remained stable for all that time.

Missing chunk of brain -- didn't matter

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 20 Days 3 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

https://www.wired.com/story/she-was-missing-a-chunk-of-her-brain-it-didnt-matter/?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB Human brains are extraordinarily large. Up to ~ 2.5 ma hominin brains were roughly in line with those of other prima

Re: Borneo rainforests unchanged for 5,000,000 years (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 20 Days 8 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

That little puddle of seawater now covering parts of Sunda doesn't affect the interior montane ecology much, compared to the massive South Pacific. It is different than low lying islands which change drastically.

Re: Borneo rainforests unchanged for 5,000,000 years (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 20 Days 14 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

At it's surface this seems virtually impossible, as during glacial periods Borneo would have been a small part of a much larger land mass. https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Sundaland-at-the-Last-Glacial-Maximum-showing-the-modern-distr

Cape Fur seals have sweaty paws in land, Calif. sealions don't.

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 21 Days 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) pups spend the first weeks of life exclusively or mainly ashore. They are exposed to intense solar radiation and high temperatures for long time periods, which results in temperatures up to at leas

H&G fat deposition & growth, sex

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 22 Days 5 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ajhb.23688

Re: hanuman evolution

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://images.app.goo.gl/YkSZX95dqeM2i8R38

Northern neanderthals at freshwater lake in Saxony

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

During ice age summer 90ka https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2022/04/neanderthals-of-north.html?m=1

Borneo rainforests unchanged for 5,000,000 years

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2022/04/a-prehistoric-forest-grows-in-brunei.html?m=1

Re: huamn evolution

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 2 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Amazon invites people to request (from the publisher) a kindle version, and believe me I clicked that.

Re: huamn evolution

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 13 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

:-) Sorry, I had no idea, but I can send our contributions...

Re: Why did Hs brains shrink 3ka? Stefan Milo video 16min (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 15 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Youtube recommended this video to me as well. Ironically, 3k years ago is almost exactly when history began, writing began. It first pops up mere centuries earlier, as far as we know, and would have taken some time to spread. In a word:

Re: huamn evolution

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 16 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

We're all fans of the great Marc Verhaegen but, dude, those prices made me faint!

Re: Black Sea refuge of quasi-hylobatids: uricase (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 18 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Fructose & uricase metabolism https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/joim.12993

Re: Why did Hs brains shrink 3ka? Stefan Milo video 16min (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Brain and a smoke. A typical lifelike situation, which shows what affects our brain, and one of the ways how our brain deals with it: https://youtu.be/9V51aSteQqI?t66

Re: Why did Hs brains shrink 3ka? Stefan Milo video 16min (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 23 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

He have the same number of neurons as expected for an ape of our size. So, nothing of the above.

Humans, headwear, foraging, shelter

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 24 Days 3 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

When you have carried a domeshield around with you, (worn as a hat??) Red Sea Hadramaut valley: hats https://images.app.goo.gl/pFa81D9ghnXgu29u8 India Africa headware baskets/pots https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Woman_with_a_b

Alps: cephalopod-sucking giant ichthyosaurs

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 24 Days 7 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://phys.org/news/2022-04-huge-ichthyosaur-largest-animals-uncovered.html

Why did Hs brains shrink 3ka? Stefan Milo video 16min

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 24 Days 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/SOgKwAJdeUc Hyper social domestication/overlaid population specialization, written language (memory synthesis), less external senses processing, more efficient logic selection

Horses have flat feet

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 24 Days 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtu.be/wfWIseGDo1s

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Does immersion in cold water reduce muscle growth? Probably. https://youtu.be/xVc2Zk2Kwyg

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

MV thinks that a freshwater clam etching is relevant to the difference between Innuit and Caucasian bone mineral density. Sorry Mr. Mermaid, we are not clams. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-04-protein-muscle-growth.html TAK1 in musc

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 3 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Public transport doesn't have much sense in the USA. Once you could drive from Boston down to Washington DC by the way of electric streetcar (tramway). Of course, not on one line, but changing lines. But then you oriented towards car

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 3 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

I got the impression that SUVs count as trucks, and that everybody is driving SUVs there, :) .

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 3 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_MBTA Our electric buses started in 1936: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolleybuses_in_Greater_Boston Public transportation is unreliable here. They try real hard to FORCE people to use it

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 4 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Diesels can't meet emissions in most states. You can buy a diesel truck but not a car. Electricity isn't free. You make it with fuel, and coal is a popular fuel for that. The EU pretends it doesn't but they never hesitated to burn coal

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 6 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Oh, not to mention public transport, which is almost non-existent in the USA. Here you need car for two things, if your kids are ill, to transfer them quickly to hospital, or to go to vacation. Everything else is faster done with p

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 9 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Yes, negligible compared to the difference between He & Hs. Pachyosteosclerosis as in H.erectus is seen in all tetrapods that begin diving, it disappeared in Cetacea & pinnipeds as they began diving faster & deeper, it's still seen in sl

8.2ka Euro mollusc consumption

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2022/04/marine-mollusc-shells-reveal-how.html?m=1

Maniq of southern Thailand, H&G forest hill people

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 17 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

As suggested by their cultural ties, the Maniq appeared to be most closely related to the Semang groups in Malaysia, indicating a recent shared history. Comparisons with other modern groups showed that the Maniq and Malay Semang populations

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Well, I am really not at the level to discuss this, but, diesel cars today are banned from city centers, in a lot of towns in Europe, I believe. The other thing is that you must include in your calculations that USA shifts all their

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 25 Days 23 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

It's a balancing act: Energy conservation vs health (environmental) concerns. Europe has always been better at conservation, but they've often done it at a great cost to the environment/public health. The United States has never been w

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 26 Days 5 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

I don't deny that USA is the best. I just know that we have technical test every year, for every car, and that emissions are measured on that test, and that you have to pass that test. I don't have a car, but I know that scooters hav

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 26 Days 6 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

I said the catalytic converter‘s have been mandatory in the United States Since the 1970s, and that they’re not required by the EU even today.. Your cite says less than half the car in the EU have catalytic converters. There is no

Re: Humans really were smarter in the past? (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 26 Days 10 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

As far as I know, EU has all those things: https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/ENVISSUENo12/page032.html

Humans really were smarter in the past?

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 26 Days 18 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Just watched an interesting video taking about lead pollution. Apparently humans have been artificially elevating the amount of lead in the environment since the neolithic, as copper smelting was still technically "Stone Age" technology..

Female fingers

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 27 Days 2 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

I have to write about this. Nobody ever talks about this, and it definitely has *great* potential to be a major part of our evolution. Everybody's talking only about male clubbing and hunting around. It is always the same, you see a

Re: Black Sea refuge of quasi-hylobatids: uricase (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 27 Days 4 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

The problem is that DNA simply does not work the way they insist that it must. I hate to keep harping on it but, again, look at Mungo Man. BILLIONS of people trace their ancestry to the same group that gave rise to him, long before any

Re: Black Sea refuge of quasi-hylobatids: uricase (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 27 Days 11 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

I don't understand those attempts of reverse engineering. From Wikipedia: "Reverse engineering (also known as backwards engineering or back engineering) is a process or method through which one attempts to understand through deducti

Black Sea refuge of quasi-hylobatids: uricase

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 27 Days 16 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Evolutionary history and metabolic insights of ancient mammalian uricases James T Kratzer cs 2014 PNAS 111:3763-8 doi org/10.1073/pnas.1320393111 We have a pseudo-gene for uricase that prevents a functional enzyme from being produced.

Re: What "anamolous" NA finds? Re: Why erectus never made it to the Americas (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 27 Days 22 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

[anomalous stupidity blissfully snipped] Wow, you repeated your idiocy and now the video I cited vanished.... IT'S LIKE MAGIC! However do you manage? Drink up. The night is young!

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 4 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Some imbeciles apparently don't get the difference between - strong bones as in H.sapiens (Blacks>Whites) & +-all mammals, - pachyosteosclerosis in H.erectus = systematically & exclusively seen in slow+shallow-diving tetrapods. Only incredi

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 4 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

What is the problem?? Early-Pleist.H.erectus was littoral-diving: had to get rid of Na+. Google "Pleistocene Homo coastal dispersal PPT".

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 8 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Hm, this is purely theoretical model, since you assume that there was a sea, more than 10 kya. Do you have any evidence for that?

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 8 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

This model is largely theoretical, since it disregards changes in sea-level. We are in Stage 'a' at the moment, since the seas rose between 16ka and 12 ka. https://opentextbc.ca/geology/chapter/17-2-landforms-of-coastal-erosion/ But t

What "anamolous" NA finds? Re: Why erectus never made it to the (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/82/2/429/2823249 Racial Differences in Bone Density between Young Adult Black and White Subjects Persist after Adjustment for Anthropometric, Lifestyle, and Biochemical Differences https://pubmed.

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 15 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16311425/ Ethnic differences in bone mineral density between inuit and Caucasians in north Greenland are caused by differences in body size

H.erectus were slow+shallow divers

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 21 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

-POS -brain enlargement -island colonisations & intercont.dispersals This is confirmed by everything we know about erectus, e.g. -stone tools -flat feet -broad bodies -midfacial prognathism -etc. IOW, only incredible idiots still believe

PO & OS in H.erectus & other salt-water-diving tetrapods

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 22 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Bone histology in extant and fossil penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) Daniel T Ksepka cs 2015 Anat.227: 611–630 doi 10.1111/joa.12367 Substantial changes in bone histology accompany the secondary adaptation to life in the water. This tra

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 22 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Please, first set things with yourself. Now you are saying that this goes quickly, at the beginning you've said that we are still at the phase "a", today. Notice, after "a" it comes to "b", which has cliffs. After "b" it comes to "c"

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 22 Hours ago by: I Envy JTEM

Sea level fell more than 100 meters during the last glacial period. I mean, it's usually described as about 100 meters lower, but that's just a round about number, not exact. Secondly, it's comparing the right now to the glacial period,

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 22 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

only incredible idiots deny this is irrelevant to the pachyosteosclerosis seen in all aquatics *initially*: H.erectus, Cetacea, pinnipeds, (still) Sirenia & many other tetrapods adaptating to diving in salt water.

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 28 Days 23 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

Geological uplifts are usually slow. Wave action is fast, and sea-level rises (at the end of glacials) and sea-level falls (at the start of glacials) are effectively instantaneous (on geological timescales). A fall of 10 or 20 metre

Re: Hs genes in ancient neanderthals, Levant, Greece (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days ago by: I Envy JTEM

[] = correction So much truth! You guys are right; JTEM is truth incarnate!

Re: Hs genes in ancient neanderthals, Levant, Greece (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: I Envy JTEM

I dunno. The topic is so complex and pretty EVERYTHING they were saying 20 years ago turned out to be bogus. The only changes now are to the technology, the ability of those using the technology to discern the history behind the test res

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: I Envy JTEM

This has always been known, and introduced here numerous times. It's one of the huge issues with "Gracile" THIS and "Robust" THAT: Without complete skeletons & a representative sampling of a population we can't really tell these things

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Subarctic people (eg. eskimos) have relatively shortest leg bones, but I don't know about their bone density.

Re: Ostrich bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Should be obvious, yet some claim not so. Compare ostrich to hummingbird leg bone density. Which one sleeps in water? Neither.

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Yup. Central West Africans have the highest bone density of AMHs.

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 1 Hour ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Thanks!

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 8 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Those folds are normal consequences of crest uplifting. Africa and Europe collide, which produces uplifting of Europe, and sinking of Africa below Europe. So, Europe has rocky coast, while Africa has shallow coast, which sinks below

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 8 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

.. . Sydney harbour is a classic 'ria' -- possible only after a large and recent rise in sea level. .. . That sequence shows 'a', 'b', 'c', and 'd'. .. . We're familiar with 'a' -- it's the time we live in. -- loads of rocky coasts an

Re: Heat improves bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 8 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Not uninteresting, thanks, but only some incredible idiots who believe their ancestors ran after antilopes over the Afr.savannas keep confusing "strong bones" with "pachy-osteo-sclerotic bones" (POS) as in all incipiently aquatic tetrapod

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 11 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Exactly. It wasn't one geological, or climatic event, that caused global change, it is the fact that humans started to burn forest, more and more, not all forest at the same time, but gradually. For this you need to be bipedal, and

Re: Ostrich bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 11 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

all early Cetacea & pinnipeds had POS, and Sirenia still have POS. Google "coastal dispersal Pleistocene Homo PPT" (+ refs).

Re: Exercise/physical activity improve bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 11 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Interesting study, but irrelevant as to why H.erectus & partially neandertals still were pachy-osteo-sclerotic. POS or pachyosteosclerosis (extremely thick & heavy skeletons, possibly more brittle due to an excess of calcium) in tetrapod

Re: Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 11 Hours ago by: littor...@gmail.com

Not "new" but old research, of course. Interesting study, but irrelevant as to why H.erectus & partially neandertals were pachy-osteo-sclerotic (as some antelope-running believers believe). POS or pachyosteosclerosis (extremely thick &

Hunter gatherers have/had higher bone density

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 13 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/hunter-gatherer-past-shows-our-fragile-bones-result-from-physical-inactivity-since-invention-of "New research across thousands of years of human evolution shows that our skeletons have become much ligh

Exercise/physical activity improve bone density

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 13 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/staying-healthy/exercise-and-bone-health/ "Exercise works on bones much like it works on muscles — it makes them stronger. Exercise is important for building strong bones when we are younger, and it is esse

Ostrich bone density

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4807808/ "The ostrich Struthio camelus reaches the highest speeds of any extant biped, and has been an extraordinary subject for studies of soft-tissue anatomy and dynamics of locomotion." "Hi

Heat improves bone density

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 14 Hours ago by: Primum Sapienti

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/09/200911093027.htm "Many biologists are familiar with Allen's Rule, from 19th-century naturalist Joel Asaph Allen, according to which animals living in warm areas have a larger surface area in

Belgian: E Af Efe pygmy water births, W Af Baka birthweights

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://www.livescience.com/51690-african-pygmy-tribe-growth-rates.html Baka newborns weigh same as French Note: claim pygmies split from Bantu 60ka not likely. https://www.naturalchild.org/articles/guest/ushanda_io_elima.html Belgian wit

Dingo = dog x wolf

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 15 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://phys.org/news/2022-04-dingoes-feral-dogs.html

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 16 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Unlike previous analyses, which observed an abrupt extinction at the Lower/Upper Vallesian boundary, our results show that this pattern actually results from uneven sampling. We rather propose a slow decrease in taxonomic richness from th

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 18 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Gorillas sleep on their bellies, no belly fur: https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-bfdad970ce16af719be0c3b39c377def.webp Chimps, bonobos and humans sleep more on their backs, and have belly fur which is very reduced vs monkeys.

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 18 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

Standard condition of primates: fur covered with a few nearly bare spots. Standard condition of AMHs: nearly bare with a few spots of fur. No marine or littoral species is similar to AMHs pelage. Arboreal apes sleep individually in bowl n

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 18 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

And also, the "impoverished" environment of Ouranopithecus and Graecopithecus was created after "Vallesian crisis", 9.6 mya, by the way of fire, at exactly the same places Graecopithecus and Ouranopithecus were found. And, look at th

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 18 Hours ago by: DD'eDeN aka note/nic

https://youtube.com/shorts/LiiLvGWSB5I?feature=share Primate hair & skin

The alarm call of hyraxes

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

https://youtu.be/mF3rPvzTPF4

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Oops, the very last picture on this page (I thought that the link will present only the picture).

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

This picture shows what I am talking about: https://opentextbc.ca/geology/chapter/17-2-landforms-of-coastal-erosion/

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 19 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Oh, this isn't a good representation. Find in YouTube videos of sea kayaking. Those sea cliffs form at the coastline, those aren't cliffs that are formed by tectonics (like rift cliffs), but by action of sea currents. For example,

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 20 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

And regarding Ouranopithecus, it is *very* similar to Graecopithecus, which is in our ancestral line: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_human_evolution_fossils#Late_Miocene_(7.2%E2%80%935.5_million_years_old) https://en.wikipedia.o

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 20 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

The Adriatic is exactly the kind of space they lived in -- the land would be fertile with plenty of trees, shrubs and grassland. But it would be pretty flat. No hills, few cliffs, few rocky coasts. Rocky coasts were rare --- too rar

Re: Hair AAT SAT (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 20 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Well, the blushing ass hypothesis is wrong, the sweating runner is wrong, since we sweat in hot as well (and, frankly, we are not runners, why would we be?, dogs are runners, and we cannot compete with other animals in running, no ma

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 21 Hours ago by: Mario Petrinovic

Humans vary in size, too. From little children to strong adults. Digging soil is about the least rough thing a tool can do. How many times do I have to tell you, humans don't have predators in sea. Sharks don't eat terrestrial fle

Re: Fresh water near coast (thread)

sci.anthropology.paleo

Posted: 29 Days 23 Hours ago by: Paul Crowley

"Hand-axes" varied enormously in size. They are found in vast quantities in water-courses nearly always with sharp edges, showing that they had not been used for any kind of rough handling. https://twitter.com/MartaMLahr/status/15135

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