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Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 22 Minutes ago by: henh...@gmail.com

thanks... So it seems quite common in French. here's where i heard it recently: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/movie_script.php?movie=o-brother-where-art-thou https://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/o_brother.html BIG M

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 4 Hours 10 Minutes ago by: Daud Deden

Jambalaya Frc prov stew from So Italy Naples, various names Ciambotta Giametta Gumbo Jumboot made in a pot or bowl Not named for any individual ingredient but for the mixture cooking/consumed in a container, often a shared (!hxaro) bowl.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 14 Hours 29 Minutes ago by: Daud Deden

Cha- may have originally referred to a ja-m-packed container with its contents. Tea and rice only date back about 2ka & 8ka. Oldest clay pots date to much older in both China & Japan. Ostrich beads (holed-discs -> holed coins) have been

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 17 Hours 3 Minutes ago by: Ross Clark

Just managed to find an older (1978) and larger Ch-Eng dictionary that I have, and they have both cha2bei1 and cha2wan3 translated as "tea-cup".

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 19 Hours 52 Minutes ago by: wugi

Rather "toute suite" I'd rather explain it as attraction of the (erroneous) "toute suite" form.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 23 Hours 1 Minute ago by: Ross Clark

OK, I put together the Mandarin word above from its two components. The Japanese word could have been formed in Japanese, rather than copied from a Chinese original. But the components are the same. Interestingly, the little J-E dictiona

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 3 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

786 = bismillah? blessings? That is 786 AD not AH but it is a possible reason. This 786 has been a curiosity. As it appears that you may be widely read on Islamic history can you recommend sources to learn more. Profile photo for Ayse T

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 4 Hours ago by: Athel Cornish-Bowden

Maybe, but in an interview yesterday the interviewer (maybe Apolline de Malherbe, but I'm not sure) said "tout court" in her first couple of sentences.

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 5 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

possibly so, but I don't know how Americans actually pronounce "tout suite".. A misanalysis of tout d' suit' as "tout suite" is indeed thinkable.

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 5 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

In fast speech by Frenc native speakers, the d can collide with the s, become somewhat devoiced, and then resemble a "tout suite" with an incorrectly expected (by Americans) to be sounded t? Any plausibility in this little theory of mine

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 6 Hours ago by: Peter T. Daniels

Pronounced in English "toute sweet" -- from which Prof. Peter Schickele was able to discover a work for calliope by P. D. Q. Bach called the Toot Suite.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 7 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Coincidence: Wok/huò - metal radical in character Caping metal cover Xyuamb whereas the "wan"

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 14 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

It should be "tout de suite" = immediately

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 14 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

I have the feeling that this expression "tout court" is a bit oldish in French, I've books.googled it and most books are from before 1900.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 14 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

cha2bei1 sounds better wan3 is more like a bowl of rice

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 15 Hours ago by: Ross Clark

Exported names for tea fall into the "te" group from Amoy/Hokkien via Dutch into Malay, English etc.; and the "cha(i)" group, from Mandarin into Russian, Arabic, English ("char") etc. Doesn't look like it. "Wok" (< Cantonese) has a co

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 17 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Hmm fearlessly reckoning further, Wan @Chn/Jpn: bowl/cup m->n? Kom @ODut: bowl/cup Amphorae @AGrk: wine bowl-bearer (not flat base, closeable bowl) XyUAM.BUATLuA: domeshield? Kup.hari.golu coracle cwrwgl Mon.golu Mbuti dome hut Note: m

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 18 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Thanks, I thought of cha/tea only after posting. Teh Cina is Malay for regular tea. I never heard of Japanese tea there. Do you know if wàn bowl is linked to wok? Wok may have started as a ceramic cooking bowl before metal age, still old

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 1 Day 20 Hours ago by: Ross Clark

specifically a tea-cup, ?from Japanese chawan 'tea bowl' (cha 'tea', wan 'bowl') ?or Chinese of some sort, cf. Mandarin cháwăn Indo dictionary says "metal cover; lobe of ear (caping telinga)" Winstedt says "metal or coconut-shell

Re: Time intervals in different languages

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 4 Hours ago by: Stefan Ram

Dingbat <ranjit_mathews@yahoo.com> writes:

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 4 Hours ago by: Stefan Ram

Ruud Harmsen <rh@rudhar.com> writes:

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 4 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Skyphos scoop cup Kyphos dome cap kuphos Cup [invert] Cap Cauan @Indo: cup cawan Caping @Indo: cap, cone straw hat Topa @Hnd: cup coracle Topi @Hnd: cap Chum @Evenki: cone hut, tipi All from xyuambuatluachualua / kupharigolu domesh

Re: root forms [Be, Go, Have] in (Spanish), English, French (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 7 Hours ago by: Peter T. Daniels

and "going to," which is also found in French. German, too, uses compound verbs for futures.

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 16 Hours ago by: henh...@gmail.com

A C-B says: --- Yes. It's a perfectly ordinary expression in French. i've heard monolingual white Americans (who know NO French) say things like [Voila!] and [Tout suite] and maybe [Tout court] in English is much more common than i

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 18 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

perio.dontal around.tooth peri.meter ku.phari.golu cwrwgl coracle endo.dontal inside.tooth endu.ra interior

Re: root forms [Be, Go, Have] in (Spanish), English, French (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 19 Hours ago by: Ross Clark

Almost certainly due to the fact that the inflectional paradigm of the English verb is much simpler. For example, present tense of "have" French: ai, as, a, avons, avez, ont 6 different forms, none of them the "root form" English: ha

root forms [Be, Go, Have] in (Spanish), English, French

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 22 Hours ago by: henh...@gmail.com

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/llegar_a_ser -------- In these times, communication becomes more important than ever. --------- I hope you get to be a part of the team this time. 1. is the Spanish word [ser] most likely to appear in

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 2 Days 23 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

Long time no see! Don't understand the question, cannot reply. Linux: unzip grep Windows: wish you luck. In Dutch, yes.

Re: (corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court] (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 1 Hour ago by: Athel Cornish-Bowden

Yes. It's a perfectly ordinary expression in French.

short words that are Esoteric, Recherche ... ?

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 3 Hours ago by: henh...@gmail.com

Usually poly-syllabic (sesquipedalian) is synonymous with Esoteric, ... What are some short words that are (nevertheless) Esoteric, Recherche ... ? Some that come to my mind are: --------------- [kith and kin], limn, littoral, nodus,

[air], 'on,' ----- Mordality marker

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 3 Hours ago by: henh...@gmail.com

(Irish, and HE = Hiberno-English) [gone on me] means something different. -- (close to the opposite in meaning, but prob ultimately from the same Irish expression) ____________________ PWJoyce {Page 28} -------- There is an idiomatic

(corpus of spoken English) --- the expression [tout court]

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 3 Hours ago by: henh...@gmail.com

1. a corpus of spoken English ---- which one should i use (first) ? 2. i got [SBCorpus.zip] which is only 1.2 MB ------- how do i search thru this in Windows 10 PC ? 3. Has anyone actually heard anyone use the expression _[tout court]_

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 8 Hours ago by: Peter T. Daniels

Burt English has no bilabial fricative, so we hear that as Vee haff vayss off making you talk (not "to make")

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 9 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

Quite interesting! That means South and East-Germany have the same kind of <w> (bilabial) as Southern variants of Dutch (the South of the Netherlands and all of Dutch speaking Belgium), and the rest of the Netherlands and the rest of Ge

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 12 Hours ago by: Helmut Richter

For me, raised in S Germany with parents from E Germany, this sounds very odd. In the S and E, [v] is not a phoneme but consistently replaced by a bilabial approximant. Hear the two audio files on the right hand side of http://en.wik

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 14 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

From quite an old thread! https://groups.google.com/g/sci.lang/c/ojF4x9KGOwQ/m/07HLhPbIBAAJ Nice to survive it. Yes. Although native English sometimes does that too, but less prominently. Vee hef vays too make you tok! Yes! Many D

Re: German english voice

sci.lang

Posted: 3 Days 21 Hours ago by: Stefan Ram

(Sorry, have not read this NG; must catch up starting with older posts from times when Franz Gnädinger was still alive!) I'm a native speaker of German but not of English. For me, the most prominent feature of the German pron

"Wimin!", the Holy Ghost said, "They are to blame."

sci.lang

Posted: 5 Days 22 Hours ago by: Doctor Denkenstein

"Wimin!", the Holy Ghost said, "They are to blame." http://boards.4channel.org/his/thread/13327968 https://desuarchive.org/his/thread/13327968 http://archived.moe/his/thread/13327968 [Return] [Catalog] [Bottom]1 / 0 / 1 / 2 [Update] [Auto

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 6 Days 5 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Very interestingly, these appear to be variants of the universal "huh?", with special suffixes.

Re: Names in Eastern Asian languages (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 7 Days 3 Hours ago by: Quinn C

In Japanese, many names are gendered, but some aren't, and for a number of them, you can't tell from just the pronunciation, but you might when you see them written. I believe this is similar in other languages of the area, like Chinese

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 9 Days 8 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Kuphos = kyphos : hump, shieldborne aback kyphosis : humpback hunchback, bent forward rounded skyphos = scoop, drinking cup I had these confused, but are simply inverting shield Kūphos = (k/h)u(m)p dome tumulus xyuambuatl wombelle Skypho

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 10 Days 3 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 12 Days 16 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/sacred-pool-of-baal-a-reinterpretation-of-the-kothon-at-motya/329646E6561765FD30A9D6EC5FD5B6CB The ‘Kothon’: its exploration and interpretation The term ‘kothon/cothon’ was

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 13 Days 5 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

- I didn't see the Chris Knight zoomcast, but watched his older videos, my response to his contention that apes do not speak because they live in a brute environment, while humans speak because we live in a virtual environment: Languag

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 13 Days 10 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Perhaps daud.um referred to David's coracle, um- in Germanic means 'around' and similar in sound to loom, room and Malay rumah (house).

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 13 Days 10 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves GM: I am interested in human evolution. DD: Did ancient Homo sleep in sand castles, or underwater like whales, or back floating like sea otters, or in sea caves like super furred sea lions, or in

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 13 Days 10 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Interesting that loom as referred to ships moving (only) up and down not forward or right/left, which is exactly what coracles do: https://images.app.goo.gl/xaB7StBarPLq72Xz6 Also interesting, coracle as boat, backpack, bucket/basket,

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 13 Days 16 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Lihyan (Arabic: لحيان, Liḥyān; Greek: Lechienoi),[1] also called Dadān or Dedan (Hebrew: דְּדָן, Dəḏān), was a powerful and highly organized ancient Arab kingdom that played a vital cultural and economic role in the north

I am tired of the LORD God Almighty posting His tabernacle is below

sci.lang

Posted: 14 Days 4 Hours ago by: Alt Atheism

https://archive.4plebs.org/pol/thread/376665446 https://archived.moe/pol/thread/376665446 I am tired of the LORD God Almighty posting His tabernacle is below Stonehenge under the Heel Stone, fuck that Creator of the universe. Alamoposter

Re: Secretory? (thread)

alt.usage.english

Posted: 14 Days 6 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

Dunno.

Re: Secretory? (thread)

alt.usage.english

Posted: 14 Days 6 Hours ago by: none

Isn't this a general property of -ory words? inventory, purgatory, promontory, inflammatory?

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 14 Days 20 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Sub.liminal From Latin līminālis, from līmen (“doorstep, threshold; doorway, entrance; beginning, commencement”)[1] + -ālis (suffix forming adjectives of relationship from nouns). Līmen is possibly derived from līmus (“askew;

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 15 Days 19 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

I suspect links to elementum@Ltn, ex liman/eliminate: off threshold, and limit/bounds https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/elementum#Latin

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 15 Days 20 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Loom as noun and verb appear to link as up and down/over-under motion of weaving/waving of ships Compare (mon)golu to geloma/lama/loom and harigolu@Indic: coracle weaving, as finger-hand-needle tool, also cf pendulum cf penis, pintu-pint

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 15 Days 20 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Cwrwgl@Welsh: coracle Corita: coracle/bullboat used on Colorado River by Amerindians (via Spn corona/cordita?)

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 15 Days 23 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Grooming, gossip & evolution of language https://g.co/kgs/NAXsXa https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0674363361/geneexpressio-20

Daniel the prophet and Son of man Ezekiel chose Stonehenge for the

sci.lang

Posted: 17 Days 2 Hours ago by: Garry Denke

https://desuarchive.org/his/thread/13269856 https://archived.moe/his/thread/13269856 [Return] [Catalog] [Bottom]3 / 3 / 1 / 1 [Update] [Auto] File: Invasion of Britain.jpg (220 KB, 1044x1002) 220 KB Anonymous 05/05/22(Thu)09:15:15 No.1326

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 17 Days 10 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

- Essence, essential (oil) not related to scents nor sent nor sense nor prescient, but to is, presence, presents essential (adj.) mid-14c., "that is such by its essence," from Late Latin essentialis, from essentia "being, essence," abstr

Re: Names in Eastern Asian languages (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 18 Days 15 Hours ago by: Dingbat

Sikhs have genderless given names. The person's gender is identified as male or female by the addition of Pal or Kaur.

"Göbeklitepe_may_be_made_by_aliens,_says_mayor"

alt.usage.english

Posted: 18 Days 17 Hours ago by: Marvin J. Mooney

<https://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/gobeklitepe-may-be-made-by-aliens-says-mayor-173262> As you were, comrades.

Re: Names in Eastern Asian languages (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 19 Days ago by: Jeff Barnett

Reply from a non linguist: There are several languages where the following sort of utterance is typical "I have 3 children plus a daughter." I wonder whether the answer to your question in re to such languages might be (statistically)

Names in Eastern Asian languages

sci.lang

Posted: 19 Days 5 Hours ago by: Jean F. Martinelle

I know very little about Eastern Asian languages, hence my question. In the languages I am familiar with - an admittedly small set - one can usually tell whether a given name is a name typically given to a male and a female. There are

Re: Free Chat Now - Free Adult Sex Chat Room (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 19 Days 10 Hours ago by: darrenn jyosh

Hurry up before I have to use my toy. My pussy need some attention

Re: What are the sites for chatting with strangers for free? (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 19 Days 10 Hours ago by: darrenn jyosh

FACE pic is a must!!! And your email address please! I will not reply without either of those.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 23 Days 15 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Episode derives from the Greek term (Ancient Greek: ἐπεισόδιον / epeisodion), meaning the material contained between two songs or odes in a Greek tragedy.[1] It is abbreviated as ep (plural eps). An episode is a coherent narrati

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 24 Days 3 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madhalla hat cf mongolu hut

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 24 Days 3 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paan_dan Paan dan @ Indo-Aryan Paan/betel leaf; dan/box, container Possible link to canata, cannister? Xyuam, njam sieve thru Dan @Mly: and

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 24 Days 4 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Note: dan also used in betel & areca nut kit, I think as a container. - "When you have carried a domeshield around with you, (worn as a hat??)" GM Red Sea Hadramaut valley: big hats https://images.app.goo.gl/pFa81D9ghnXgu29u8 India A

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 25 Days 18 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

South Thailand hill forest people H&G Maniq As suggested by their cultural ties, the Maniq appeared to be most closely related to the Semang groups in Malaysia, indicating a recent shared history. Comparisons with other modern groups showe

Why did G-D have Daniel the prophet and Son of man Ezekiel bury his

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 1 Hour ago by: Denoco Inc.

https://archive.4plebs.org/s4s/thread/10223879 https://archived.moe/s4s/thread/10223879 Why did G-D have Daniel the prophet and Son of man Ezekiel bury his mishkan at Stonehenge then later have John the baptist and Son of man Jesus move He

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 4 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Taiwan: carry, lift, uncover; archaic baskets/domeshields? https://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=54452#more-54452 Now we have to tackle dàn 担. The character by itself can mean many things. It is generally regarded as the simplifie

Index of linguists

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 12 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

I've been thinking of a typological index of linguists, using Greek letters.. And I'd like to have your feedback. Language as an instrument γ graphemes, writing systems, epigraphy, decipherment λ lexemes, morphemes, classes, parts of

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 14 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

Neither to me. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E7%85%99%E7%AE%A1#Etymology_1 suggest that the Japanese comes from Khmer (Cambodean), and that _that_ word in turn might be from Spanish or Portuguese. There was contact from Portuguese i

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 16 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Entotsu smokestack, chimney

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 16 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Thanks. Kiseru from kissel? (fruit punch: sucked from a straw?) Compare to Malay suck hisap, smoke asap. At least a vague resemblance. Philippines link via Manilla galleon trade? Phil suck sumuso, smoke usok. Japanese word for non-smok

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 26 Days 22 Hours ago by: Ross Clark

A general term for tobacco pipe. Written in kana, so probably not a native word, and certainly not Chinese. As you can see from the article, tobacco was only introduced to Japan a few centuries ago. Dutch would be the first place I'd l

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 27 Days 12 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Kiseru @Jpn : long smoking pipe https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiseru

Re: The Linguistic Chronicles of Copernicus # 01 (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 28 Days 16 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

Another possibility is that I answer my own post, so that the system will reformat it.

Re: Paleo-etymology (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 29 Days 2 Hours ago by: Daud Deden

Oops, I meant pita-ru (Austl). Compare to phitti of Hunza region: Phitti is a type of leavened bread baked by Hunzakut People of Hunza, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. The dough thus prepared is placed in a metallic vessel called a Khimishdo

Re: The Linguistic Chronicles of Copernicus # 01 (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 29 Days 3 Hours ago by: Peter T. Daniels

You touch the Enter (or Return) key at the end of a line of a normal length.. It is no more onerous, and it is easier, than using a typewriter used to be.. In many cases, you do need to do the same with a passage you copy- paste from a

Re: The Linguistic Chronicles of Copernicus # 01 (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 29 Days 5 Hours ago by: Ruud Harmsen

In Google Groups, which you seem to be using, you are supposed to introduce the line breaks manually yourself. Quite primitive, but well, it's GG.

Re: The Linguistic Chronicles of Copernicus # 01 (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 29 Days 5 Hours ago by: Arnaud Fournet

I have no way of selecting a parameter, that would achieve that formatting of 72 characters. This is beyond my control.

Re: The Linguistic Chronicles of Copernicus # 01 (thread)

sci.lang

Posted: 29 Days 7 Hours ago by: Mikko

The two lines above are too long. You should split your lines, including quoted lines, to a reasonable length (no longer that 72 characters). Mikko

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